Bachelor Of Architectural Studies Honours

Degree Profile for the Bachelor of Architectural Studies Honours Degree (BAS)

NUST code:

BAS

DURATION:

5 Years

TYPE OF DEGREE:

HONOURS

CREDIT LOAD:

670 Credits

LEVEL 
 

 SADC-QF - Level 8

ACCREDITATION ORGANISATION(S):

Architects Council of Zimbabwe

LEARNING MODE:
 

 Conventional (Bulawayo)

 

The Bachelor of Architectural Studies Honours Degree Programme is a five-year design oriented programme structured to integrate the basic elements of architecture (construction, structure, function, form and space) with the professional requirements of architectural practice responsive to the changing needs of society in the contemporary world.

To qualify, register and practise as architects, graduates must satisfy the educational and professional practice requirements of the Institute of Architects of Zimbabwe and the Architects Council of Zimbabwe.
These include five years of full-time higher education in Architecture, and two years of work experience in an architectural office under the supervision of a registered architect, followed by an examination in Professional Practice.

The Department has established and maintains close ties with both institutions such as the Institute of Architects of Zimbabwe, the Zimbabwe Institute of Quantity Surveyors, and with the Association of Building Contractors as well as with the building industry in Zimbabwe.

Graduates can look forward to employment by developers, architects, engineers (civil, structural, mechanical and hydraulic) local government and central government agencies, contractors and sub-contractors in the project planning and implementation of a variety of projects.


Degree Profile for the Bachelor of Architectural Studies Honours Degree (BAS)


PURPOSE OF THE PROGRAMME
The programme equips graduates with analytical and problem-solving skills, and academic qualifications necessary for architectural practice responsive to the changing needs of society in the contemporary world.

PROGRAMME CHARACTERISTICS
Areas of Study: Architecture
Specialist Focus: Element and spatial design, materials, construction technology
Orientation: Design oriented teaching and learning are professionally guided and focused on practical and theoretical aspects

TEACHING AND LEARNING
Teaching and Learning Methods: Design Studio, Lectures, tutorials, seminars, group work, site & field visits, industrial attachment, research project, individual independent study.
Assessment Methods: Written and oral examinations, tests, site & field reports, seminar presentations, industrial attachment report, final year design project report, portfolio inspection, and continuous assessments through presentation critiques.

INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Demonstrate ability to take responsibility for actions and decisions in the development of independent design
  • Demonstrate ability to communicate ideas effectively in a variety of appropriate of ways. Use of concepts and principles from specialized fields and allied disciplines into various architectural problems.
  • Demonstrate innovation in design. Creation of architectural solutions by applying knowledge in history, theory, planning, building technology and utilities, structural concepts and professional practice
  • Demonstrate ability to apply communication techniques, knowledge and understanding to practical applications in architecture. Use of various information and communication technology (ICT) media for architectural solutions, presentation, and techniques in design and construction.
  • Demonstrate ability to demonstrate knowledge of architectural precedent and to place architectural practice within a contextual framework
  • Demonstrate knowledge of current architectural practices and the context of the profession. Interpretation and application of relevant laws, codes, charters and standards of architecture and the built environment
  • Demonstrate ability to reflect and engage in self-critique and critical thinking
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AND FURTHER EDUCATION

Employability: Graduates can be employed by developers, architects, engineers (civil, structural, mechanical and hydraulic) local government and central government agencies, contractors and sub-contractors in the project planning and implementation of a variety of projects.
Further Studies: M Arch, MSc, MPhil

Normal Entry:

A pass at ‘A’ Level or its equivalent in Mathematics, Physics, Art, Geometrical & Mechanical Drawing, Technical Graphics or Design Technology, and two other approved subjects at ‘A” Level.

 

Special Entry

 Applicants must have a National Diploma in Architecture or Architectural Technology or Architectural Graphics and relevant experience preferably under a registered Architect.

Mature Entry

General Regulations shall apply.


Applicants may be required to attend a special interview and/or to submit a portfolio of work.

Students admitted who do not have `A' Level Mathematics or Physics are required to take BAR 1106 - Introduction to Architectural Mathematics in the first semester of Year One.


 

The Bachelor of Architectural Studies Honours Degree Programme is a five-year design oriented programme structured to integrate the basic elements of architecture (construction, structure, function, form and space) with the professional requirements of architectural practice responsive to the changing needs of society in the contemporary world.
The programme shall be offered on a full-time basis.

Industrial Attachment
The 5-year Bachelor of Architectural Studies programme includes a minimum of 28 weeks of supervised industrial attachment. The attachment shall normally be taken during Year IV of the programme.
During Industrial Attachment Year the student shall be governed by the General Regulations for Industrial Attachment as well as any other Faculty/Departmental Regulations where applicable. Students, who wish to have their Industrial Attachment Year outside Zimbabwe, must seek, and obtain Academic Board approval on recommendation by the Department and Faculty.
 
Mode of Assessment
The assessment of a Module is based on formal Examinations and Continuous Assessment. Unless otherwise specified, the formal Examination shall normally contribute 50% and Continuous Assessment/Coursework shall contribute 50% of the final marks.

Examinations
Final Examinations shall take place towards the end of each Semester for each Module, at dates to be specified in the University Calendar.

Minimum Pass Mark and Aggregate Marks
The minimum pass mark for a module shall be 50% as prescribed in the General Regulations.
Modules within each Year of the degree programme are weighted according to the notional study hours spent on the module: Weight values are shown against each module title in the List of Modules.
The aggregate mark for a Year shall be the weighted average of aggregate marks for the modules constituting the programme of study for that Year.
 The overall aggregate mark shall be the weighted average of aggregate marks for the Years constituting the programme of study for the degree.

Proceeding to the following Year
A student may proceed to the following Year upon satisfying the examiners in all the Modules for the Year.
Subject to the provisions in the General Regulations, a student may proceed to the following Year provided he\she gets an aggregate of 50% or more and has passed at least 75% of the modules.

Carrying Over
A student shall not be permitted to proceed to the following Year carrying Design Studio or a module which is prerequisite to the next module.

Degree Classification
In determining a student's Degree Classification, Years of the Degree Programme shall be weighted and credited as follows:
Year I Minimum Credit 134
Year II 15% Minimum Credit 136
Year III 25% Minimum Credit 140
Year IV 10% Minimum Credit 120
Year V 50% Minimum Credit 140

YEAR I (Total 134)


Semesters 1 and 2
CREDITS

BAR 1001 Design Studio I   64


Semester 1

BAR 1102 Architectural Presentation Techniques/Descriptive Geometry I 8

BAR 1103 History of Architecture I 6

BAR 1104 Introduction to Materials and Construction I 6

BAR 1105 Society and the Built Environment I 6

BAR 1106 Introduction to Architectural Mathematics 4

BAR 1107 Fine Art Studio I 4

CTL 1101 Conflict Transformation & Leadership 10


Semester 2

BAR 1202 Architectural Presentation Techniques/Descriptive Geometry II 8

BAR 1203 History of Architecture II 6

BAR 1204 Introduction to Materials and Construction II 6

BAR 1205 Society and the Built Environment II 6

BAR 1206 Applied Structural Statics and Dynamics 4



YEAR II (Total 136)


Semesters 1 and 2

BAR 2001 Design Studio II 64


Semester 1

BAR 2101 Building Construction I 12

BAR 2103 Computer Aided Architectural Design I 8

BAR 2104 Environmental Design I 6

BAR 2105 Structural Design I 4

BAR 2106 Introduction to Economics 4

BAR 2107 Fine Art Studio II 4


Semester 2

BAR 2202 Building Construction II 12

BAR 2203 Computer Aided Architectural Design II 8

BAR 2204 Environmental Design II 6

BAR 2205 Structural Design II 4

BAR 2206 Zimbabwe Housing 4


YEAR III (Total 140)


Semesters 1 and 2

BAR 3001 Design Studio III 64


Semester 1

BAR 3103 Building Services I 6

BAR 3104 Contemporary History and Theory of Architecture I 6

BAR 3105 Issues of Housing Supply in Developing Countries 4

BAR 3106 Urban Planning and Design I 6

BAR 3107 Fine Art Studio III 4

BAR 3108 Building Construction III 12


Semester 2

BAR 3203 Building Services II 6

BAR 3204 Contemporary History and Theory of Architecture II 6

BAR 3207 Urban Planning and Design II 6

BAR 3208 Building Construction IV 12

BAR 3209 Research Methods 4

BAR 3210 Introduction to Architectural Office Practice 4



YEAR IV (Total 120)


Semesters 1 and 2

BAR 4001 Industrial Attachment 80

BAR 4005 Architectural Office Practice 20


YEAR V (Total 140)


Semesters 1 and 2

BAR 5001 Design Studio 80


Semester 1

BAR 5102 Building Construction V 16

BAR 5103 Dissertation 24

BAR 5104 Introduction to Professional Practice 7

BAR 5105 Environmental Impact Assessment 7


Semester 2

Electives

BAR 5203 Topics in Rural Design 6

BAR 5204 Topics in Urban Design 6


BAR 1001 DESIGN STUDIO

The teaching of architectural design in the studio is the core of the programme of architectural studies and is the foundation of the education of every architect. As a discipline architectural design is a synthesis of the principles of composition animated by designer's creativity, and the functional requirements of human needs and purposes. An architect long ago identified the essential ingredients of architecture as: commodity, firmness and delight.

The first two components require the architect to be a social scientist, knowledgeable about and responding to human needs and the ordering of society, and a technologist, capable of ensuring that his buildings are structurally sound, and work efficiently; the final component, delight, is less tangible, less easy to define. The capacity to create buildings that lift the spirit, give pleasure to the user and the visitor, and that enhance the environment requires the architect to be an artist.

Architectural students, therefore, need to acquire skills and develop capabilities in all three areas, as social scientists, as technologists, and as artists: and to apply these skills and capabilities holistically. All the theoretical and practical modules in the five-year Bachelor of Architectural Studies programme teach skills and develop capabilities in one or other of these three areas. Design Studio in every Part of the programme, not only nurtures the architectural student as a creative designer, as an artist, but also draws all the areas of knowledge, all the disciplines together in one indivisible whole.

At the end of the Part, students assemble a portfolio for review by staff to determine their attainment of the necessary design knowledge and skills for continuing into Part II.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

BAR 1102/1202 TECHNIQUES OF ARCHITECTURAL PRESENTATION/ DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY I/II        

The module is an introduction to the purpose of architectural drawings and the process of communication through architectural drawings. It covers types of two-dimensional and three-dimensional drawings and their uses as well as the relationship between scale and degree of detail. It also provides for architectural lettering, the use of hatching and shading, the layout of architectural drawing sheet. The second semester continues with more complex presentation techniques: exploded 3 - dimensional projections, 1, 2 and 3-point perspectives. It sums it up with applications of Descriptive Geometry, Reprographic Techniques and the nature and function of working drawings.

Module Assessment: 100% continuous assessment

BAR 1103/1203 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE I/II         

The module aims to demonstrate the relevance of architectural history to contemporary practice, to equip the student with a basic vocabulary and the ability to recognize and interpret key historical architectural forms and ideas, and to impart an enthusiasm for historical architecture, rather than rote-learning of facts and figures. The second semester examines the major architectural and urban design developments of the 19th and 20th Centuries, and the underlying theories of form, function, composition and expression.

Module Assessment: 100% continuous assessment

BAR 1104/1204 INTRODUCTION TO MATERIALS AND CONSTRUCTION I/II        

An introductory review of the materials used in construction, of their physical properties and characteristics, and the processes they undergo to convert them to building materials. The module in the second semester, explores constructional systems, and the ways in which materials are used in construction; with visits to construction sites.

Module Assessment: 30% Coursework 70% Examination

BAR 1105/1205 SOCIETY AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT I/II       

A study, through selected readings and discussions, of the relationship between types of settlement and community structure and the built environment, and of the ways in which men and women, through the way they live and the work they do, shape their environment. In the second semester, the module introduces students to the basic principles of African cultures and to the architectural and settlement formation patterns that derived from those principles. The impact of the slave trade, of colonisation and of the modern global economy, on African development is examined, and the ways these impacts are reflected in the built environment.

Module Assessment:  50% Coursework 50%Examination

BAR 1106 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL MATHEMATICS

A module for those students who do not have `A' level Mathematics to prepare them for the module AAR 1206, Applied Structural Statics and Dynamics.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

BAR 1107 FINE ART STUDIO I

Creativity, the ability to conceive designs for buildings and spaces, to visualize design concepts, and to convey these in a comprehensible way graphically to people who have no architectural training is a talent few people are born with but all can acquire. This module and its successors in Parts II and III are designed to enable students to develop their individual creativity through a variety of fine art experiences. The Fine Art Studio programme begins with life drawing, line drawing, and sketching.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 1206 APPLIED STRUCTURAL STATICS AND DYNAMICS

An introduction to the static and dynamic behaviour of the major structural systems applied in architecture. An examination of monolithic wall, post-and-lintel and multi-storey framed construction, tunnels, vaults and domes, suspended, catenary and tensile structures, etc., to enable the students to develop their understanding of the structural principles that underlay their physical structural forms. An investigation of the performance of structural systems subjected to variable loads and case studies to demonstrate the practical application of structural theory. Students are encouraged to develop their analytical capabilities in relating the sizes of components to the physical characteristics of structural elements and the analysis of forces acting on them.

Module Assessment: 50% Coursework 50% Examination

BAR 2001 DESIGN STUDIO II

The main emphasis in the second-year studio is the integration of structural and environmental factors (as taught in the parallel lecture modules) into the design of a building of moderate size and complexity. The studio shall investigate the application of a variety of constructional, structural and environmental systems, and assess the appropriateness of alternative technologies.

In addition, students shall continue to develop an understanding of the decision-making processes of architectural design; they shall continue to develop their critical and analytical skills, and how to learn from architectural precedent. They shall prepare and submit a major integrated design project at the end of the year.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 2102/2202 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I/II

The Module examines the construction process and the materials used in construction through lectures, case studies and project assignments. Students shall be required to study a building under construction and create a portfolio for documenting the project. The second semester of the module investigates a range of conventional construction systems, for foundations, walls, suspended floors and roofs. Systems are compared in timber, steel, masonry, and reinforced and precast concrete. Lectures are supplemented by demonstrations and site visits.

Module Assessment: 30% Coursework 70% Examination

BAR 2103/2203- COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I/II

Coursework focuses on thinking skills, creativity and expression and provides a practical introduction to the use of computers in design, various electronic graphic representations used in design, and functionality and structure of modern CAD systems. Students are later given theoretical and practical introduction to the computer-based drawing and design tools and techniques through lectures and hands-on instruction and demonstration. Emphasis is placed on the creation of three-dimensional models using computer facilities, which includes PCs, plotters, digitisers, laser printers etc.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 2104/2204 -ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN I/II

This is an introduction to the ways in which buildings respond to and modify the environment, with emphasis on thermal, acoustic and lighting performance. Simple methods of calculation are introduced. An investigation of the climatic factors derived from several African climatic zones, the influence of topography, surrounding buildings and open spaces on the micro-climate of buildings, and the principles of thermal comfort.

In the second semester students shall be given guidance on the environmental design of their integrated design project in the studio, and shall be required to present a detailed report.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 2105/2205- STRUCTURAL DESIGN I/II

The module is an introduction to structural systems, and their underlying physical principles, using historical and contemporary precedents. Simple methods of calculation are introduced, and field trips and laboratory demonstrations are included. Students are shown a range of contemporary structures, and the rationale underlying their use. Special emphasis shall be placed on the enclosure of space, and the relationship between the functional uses of underlying (or overlying) spaces and the form of structure that encloses (or supports) them. Attention is given to detailed design and jointing systems. Students shall be given guidance on the choice and design of structure for their integrated design project in the studio, and shall be required to present a detailed report.

Module Assessment: 30% Coursework 70% Open Book Examination


BAR 2106 -INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS

The objectives of the module are to familiarize students with the basic principles of economics and the relationship between economics and development. The module is a prerequisite for modules AAR 2206, AAR 3105 and AAR 3106. Topics covered include: Basic Principles of Economics; The economic basis of national development, and the role of the building industry; The relationship between the urban economy of cities and the national economy; The roles of property, infrastructure, and investment in the development of the urban economy; The effects of globalization on the national economy; The roles of international agencies (e.g. the World Bank) and Multi-national corporations in national development.

Module Assessment:  50% Coursework 50%


BAR 2107 FINE ART STUDIO II

The Fine Art Studio programme continues with studies and exercises in the perception, application and use of colour in a variety of media.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

BAR 2206 ZIMBABWE HOUSING

An investigation of the various types of housing that have been provided traditionally by local communities, and more recently by (1) the state, (2) by individuals, non-governmental agencies and community groups, in terms of planning, design, production and delivery systems, and household satisfaction.

Module Assessment: 50% Coursework 50% Examination


BAR 3001 DESIGN STUDIO III

The main emphasis in the third-year studio is the integration of Architectural Design Studies, so that students can understand the relationships, in formal and social terms, between the city, the settlement, the individual building, and the people who live or work in them. Emphasis shall be placed on urban morphologies, and the spaces between buildings, and the interrelationships between form, structure, technology and detail. Selected specialised building types shall be explored within the urban context. Architectural and Urban Design Projects shall be set requiring students to develop their design brief, study and analyse the site, apply appropriate design methods to develop their design proposals and to present these to develop their design competence in the related Building Construction, Building Services, Environmental Design and Structural Design.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 3103/3203 BUILDING SERVICES I & II

The modules introduce students to the important subject of building services, giving sufficient coverage of the topics to provide solid theoretical groundwork together with practical knowledge of the infrastructural services required in buildings. These include cold water supply and distribution, hot water supply and distribution, solid waste and rain water drainage, sewage treatment and its disposal, refuse/garbage removal and disposal, electrical and telephone services for buildings, ventilation and air conditioning, acoustics, services access (lifts and escalators), external access to buildings, fire-fighting.

Apart from lectures, students are required to use their knowledge and understanding on practical projects in Design Studio. Investigative assignments are also undertaken on chosen sites which require students to liaise with public offices such as City Planners, Engineers and Surveyors. This enhances skills in preparation for office practice.

Module Assessment:  50% Coursework 50% Examination


BAR 3104/3204- CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND THEORY OF ARCHITECTURE I & II

At the end of the modules, the student should be able to identify and classify historical and theoretical facts about the twentieth century architecture through their characteristics, as well as apply the same in practical use, in the process of application of these facts in their own discussions, works and designs.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 3105 -ISSUES OF HOUSING SUPPLY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

A series of lectures/seminars exploring the issue of housing in consideration of specific topics as related to socio-cultural, economic and political factors, building materials, structural systems, shelter accessories, and manufacturing technologies. The module examines major development theories and contemporary design issues and characteristics of low-income housing needs and housing delivery systems. It also examines the formal and informal housing sector and asks why the housing sector is important for both national governments and international organisations.

Module Assessment:  50% Coursework 50%


BAR 3106/3207 -URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN I/II

The module examines the evolution of the city in history and its contemporary manifestations in Africa and world-wide. The operations of several cities and metropolitan areas are analysed. A general survey is made of major development theories and contemporary issues and the characteristics of high, medium and low-income societies that establish contexts for development planning and policy-making. The module provides the theoretical basis for the Urban Design Project to be undertaken in Design Studio III. It examines settlement patterns, education, health and recreational facilities, streets and circulation/transportation networks, infrastructural provisions and services, and reviews and evaluates urban management systems.

Students shall be introduced through design exercises to the vocabulary of design elements, both natural and artificial, that are available to the landscape architect, and to the scope of landscape planning at regional and district levels, and of landscape design in urban and rural context.

Module Assessment:  50% Coursework 50% Examination


BAR 3107 -FINE ART STUDIO III

The Fine Art Studio programme concludes with elective studies in calligraphy, graphic design, interior decoration, and photography and theatre design.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 3108/3208 -BUILDING CONSTRUCTION III & IV

These modules shall deal with the construction process and techniques of larger buildings and special topics in construction practice. Subsoil analysis and foundations for larger buildings, Floors, roofs and wall construction systems for larger buildings, Exclusion of rain water, internal components and finishes, Industrial buildings. It covers structural fire protection. Temporary works: formwork systems, shoring, scaffolding, Underpinning. Demolition works, Construction plant and equipment. External work: roads, paving, Durability and maintenance, Building codes. (Site visits and site reporting shall be an integral of the module). An introduction to Building Economics is included in Semester 2 (AAR 3208).

Module Assessment:  50% Coursework 50% Examination


BAR 3209 -RESEARCH METHODS

The purpose of the module is to introduce the student to the role and purpose of research in the study and practice of architecture, and to research principles and techniques generally; to guide him/her in the selection of a research topic and the preparation and drafting of a research proposal; and to instruct the student in the techniques of research writing. This module has particular relevance to the selection and approval of the student's dissertation topic. Prerequisite for AAR 5103 Dissertation

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 3210 -INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL OFFICE PRACTICE

The module is an introduction to the practice of architecture within the architectural office, in preparation for the year of Industrial Attachment. Topics covered include preparation and execution of working drawings, compliance with building codes and byelaws, office and site meeting procedures. Prerequisite for AAR 4005 Architectural Office Practice

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

BAR 4001 INDUSTRIAL ATTACHMENT

Students on completion of Parts I - III of the Bachelor of Architectural Studies programme shall be attached to architectural offices, to work as architectural assistants for a period of one full year of supervised Industrial Attachment.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 5103 -DISSERTATION

During their year of Industrial Attachment, students are required to register and set aside time outside normal working hours to work on their dissertations. The dissertation proposal is to be ready for presentation at a seminar about the middle of Semester I, following the approval of which, the student shall proceed on conducting the research. Supervision shall be provided, and periodic seminars shall be held to review progress during the year of Industrial Attachment.


BAR 4005 -ARCHITECTURAL OFFICE PRACTICE

During their year of Industrial Attachment, students are required to complete log sheets as of the training process.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 5001 -DESIGN STUDIO

In Semester 1, through the medium of a major urban design/comprehensive development project for a down town area of a major city, issues of urban design, and landscaping of major public open spaces, architectural integrity, conservation of historic buildings, commercial viability and social and cultural acceptability are examined. The integration of technology, construction and services with the overall architectural and urban design concept is a major objective of the individual design projects developed by each student.

The final Graduation Design Project which occupies the whole of Semester 2, is a major building or group of buildings of the student's own choice for a site also selected by the student, subject to the approval of the Departmental Board. The project is intended as a vehicle for the demonstration of the designer's competence in all aspects of design and technology, and is developed in depth and in detail and presented graphically.

The Project Report completes the regular sequence of supporting studies required by students working on their graduation project. It is devoted to the development of the project proposal. Students shall also programme and develop a site analysis. Weekly seminars shall be held during each Semester to monitor progress.

The final written report, establishes the feasibility of the project and contains all the relevant research data and developmental design studies is an essential component of the Graduation Project.

The Project Report is descriptive and analytical record of the development of a complex architectural project.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 5102 -BUILDING CONSTRUCTION V

The module investigates a range of innovative building construction systems, their applications and techniques generally, and with specific reference to Zimbabwe: industrialised building systems; portal frames; claddings to framed structures; pre-stressed concrete; and innovative roof structures - space frames, conoid shell roofs, folded plate roofs, tensile structures, etc.

Module Assessment:  100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 5103 -DISSERTATION

During their year of Industrial Attachment, students are required to register and set aside time outside normal working hours to work on their dissertations. The dissertation proposal is to be ready for presentation at a seminar about the middle of Semester I, following the approval of which, the student shall proceed on conducting the research. Supervision shall be provided, and periodic seminars shall be held to review progress during the year of Industrial Attachment.

In Year 5 of the programme of study, the final stages of the production of the dissertation which was began during the Industrial Attachment are completed, and the dissertation submitted for examination.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 5104 -INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

This module provides a lecture/seminar format to discuss the historic development of the profession, role of the architect in contemporary society, current forms of practice and emerging trends, contractual relationships, ethical responsibility, office management and promotion. Case Studies are used to demonstrate the practical application of information as well as analytical techniques to strengthen design and planning abilities.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

BAR 5105 -ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT

The concepts and issues in environmental planning and ecological conservation are covered in the module. Covered here are also objectives of and statutory provisions for EIA's in Zimbabwe. EIA techniques and analyses; mitigatory measures; project implementation. A case study of EIA’s of infrastructural, industrial and urban developments.

Module Assessment:  100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 5203 -TOPICS IN RURAL DESIGN (ELECTIVE)       

The module offers a multi-disciplinary approach leading to the understanding of the political, socio-economic, and technological framework of rural systems and their dynamic interrelationships.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment


BAR 5204 -TOPICS IN URBAN DESIGN (ELECTIVE)

The module offers a multi-disciplinary approach leading to the understanding of the political, socio-economic, and technological framework of urban systems and its dynamic interrelationships.

Module Assessment: 100% Continuous Assessment

   

CONVENTIONAL

$565/semester

PARALLEL

$665/semester

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