Bachelor of Science Honours Degree in Journalism and Media Studies

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE HONOURS DEGREE IN JOURNALISM AND MEDIA STUDIES

NUST code

 IJM

DURATION:

4 Years

TYPE OF DEGREE:

HONOURS

CREDIT LOAD:

532-534

LEVEL 
 

 SADC-QF - Level 8

ACCREDITATION ORGANISATION(S):

Zimbabwe Council for Higher Education (ZIMCHE)

LEARNING MODE 
 

Conventional (Bulawayo Only),
Parallel (Bulawayo Only),
 

The Bachelor of Science Honours Degree in Journalism and Media Studies programme is aimed at students who are keen to pursue careers in the media and communication fields. The programme seeks to equip students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills to work in the media and communication industry that is being constantly transformed by political, economic, social and technological changes.

Regulations

These regulations should be read in conjunction with the general university regulations for undergraduate studies, and the regulations of the Faculty of Communication and Information Science.

The Degree shall be awarded to students who have successfully completed the programme and passed the examinations in accordance with the regulations set out below.

Normal Entry

Applicants must have the following qualifications (or their equivalent):

 Five ‘O’ Level passes including English Language, and Mathematics with at least a C grade is an added advantage.

Applicants with English Literature and/or Ndebele/Shona and any other approved ‘A’ Level Arts subject may be admitted into the BSc in Journalism and Media Studies.

Special Entry

Applicants who have successfully completed a National Diploma in Mass Communication, or have otherwise obtained equivalent qualifications, may apply for direct entry into Part I, depending on the experience acquired at the time of application.

Applicants who have a first degree from this or any other recognised institution may be allowed into the BSc (Hons) in Journalism and Media Studies.

 

Structure of Programme

The degree programme may be studied on a full-time basis over four academic years. At Part I, students shall take modules on media theory, as well as several practical modules on print and broadcast media. At Part II, they shall have a choice of two practical electives.

 

One year of the programme (at least 30 weeks) is ear-marked for industrial attachment. A student placed under an organisation for attachment shall be required to submit himself/herself to rules and regulations as apply to the employees of that organisation. Should it become necessary for the student under attachment to move to another organisation, permission must be granted by the University.

 

In the first semester of Part IV, a student shall take six core modules and one beat elective. The majority of these electives shall be taught at an advanced level in the second semester of Part IV. In the second semester of Part IV, a student shall take three core modules and shall choose two practicals and one beat elective. However, a student who has taken an introductory beat elective in the first semester and does not wish to continue to an advanced level can choose a non-advanced Part IV beat elective, or a Part II practical elective.

 

Purpose of the Programme

The aim of the Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Journalism and Media Studies is to produce graduates who can work in an industry that is facing various challenges, and which is being transformed by political, economic, and technological changes. The degree, therefore, seeks to equip students with skills that enable them to work in various media fields.

 

Programme Characteristics

Areas of Study

The programme focuses on several key areas, including:

  • Media theories, media ethics and media law.
  • News and feature reporting and writing.
  • Information technology and online journalism.
  • Public relations and advertising.

 

Specialist Focus

  • Print, broadcast and online journalism.
  • Public relations.
  • Media studies.

 

Orientation

     The programme gives equal weight to theory and practice.

Career Opportunities and Further Education

            Graduates can work in several fields, including newspapers, magazines, television, radio, online publications, public relations, advertising, government, non-governmental organisations, and in academia. Graduates of the programme can also proceed to Master’s programmes in journalism and media studies, public relations, advertising, and developmental studies, among others.

Programme Delivery

            Teaching and learning methods include lectures, tutorials, seminars, laboratory practicals, group work, industrial visits, industrial attachment, research projects, and independent study. Students are assessed through essays, tests, oral presentations, practical work (news and feature stories, documentaries, radio programmes, etc), published news and feature stories, industrial attachment assessment, industrial attachment reports, and dissertations, among other means. Students taking practical modules are expected to produce industry-standard work.

 

Programme Competencies

Generic Competencies

  • Ability to analyse and synthesise information.
  • Methodological problem solving.
  • Critical thinking.
  • Verbal and written communication skills.
  • Ability to reason and argue persuasively.
  • Commitment to integrity and ethical conduct.

 

Discipline Specific Competencies

  • Multimedia reporting and writing skills.
  • Media literacy.
  • Multimedia production skills.
  • Media critique and analysis.
  • Research skills.
  • Commitment to integrity and ethical conduct.

 

Exit Level Outcomes

Graduates of the programme should be able to:

  • Report and write news and features for print, broadcast and online media.
  • Utilise communication and publicity skills to pursue careers in the communication and public relations fields.
  • Produce and understand a wide variety of media products, including films/documentaries, blogs/websites, magazines/newspapers, etc.
  • Utilise their knowledge of the media industry and its techniques to analyse and critique its operations.
  • Conduct research that identifies problems and suggests solutions that benefit the media industry and society.

Minimum Body of Knowledge in Journalism and Media Studies

  • Skills to write and report news for print, broadcast and online media.
  • Communication and publicity skills to pursue careers in the communication and public relations fields.
  • Knowledge to produce and understand a wide variety of media products including films/documentaries, blogs/websites, magazines/newspapers etc.
  • Knowledge of the media industry and techniques to analyse and critique its operations.
  • Media literacy skills to enable students to engage with the society.
  • Research skills to identify problems and suggest solutions for the benefit of society.

 Scheme of Examination and Assessment
Faculty regulations for examinations shall apply.


However, in the following modules, coursework shall account for 50% of overall assessment, while formal examination shall account for the other 50%:

IJM 1114         Foundation Skills in Journalism

IJM 1121         Introduction to Radio Production

IJM 1222         Introduction to Television Production

IJM 1223         News Writing

IJM 2122         Reporting and Writing

IJM 2123         Design and Layout

IJM 2124         Scriptwriting for Television and Radio

IJM 2214         Fundamentals of Film and Video Production

IJM 2220         Feature Writing

 

  • The following modules shall be examined entirely through continuous assessment. That is, continuous assessment shall account for 100 percent of the overall mark:

                                    IJM 4220         Advanced Feature Writing

IJM 4221         Print Project

                                    IJM 4222         Advanced Film and Documentary Production Project

                                    IJM 4223         Advanced Radio Production

IJM 4215         New Media: Practical project

                                    IJM 4224         Advanced Photojournalism

IJM 4225         Sports Reporting II

 

6.2 Examination for modules in which continuous assessment accounts for 50 percent or 100 percent of the overall mark must meet the following basic requirements:

  • In modules where students are assessed on news stories, features, or other types of articles, students must submit a minimum of five assignments, each of which must be revised at least once before being resubmitted for grading.
  • In broadcasting production modules, students must submit a minimum of four scripts and must also be assessed on production and post-production work.
  • If students opt to produce a class magazine or newspaper for IJM 4221 (Print Project), they shall be assessed on individual pages produced for the publication.
  • A student who fails a module that is examined 100 percent through continuous assessment shall not be able to supplement. That is, the student must repeat the module in the next Academic Year.
  • The following Grading Scheme shall be applied for all modules in the Programme:

75% and above                        1          (First Division)

65% - 74%                              2.1       (Upper Second Division)

60% - 64%                              2.2       (Lower Second Division)

50% - 59%                              Pass

Below 50%                             Fail

  • The following are the contributions of each Part to the overall assessment:

Part I                                       10%

Part II                                      20%

Part III                                    20%

Part IV                                    50%

 

Part I (135 Credits)

 

Semester I(All Core Modules) (72 Credits)

IJM 1113                     Media in Zimbabwe (10 Credits)

IJM 1114                     Foundation Skills for Journalists (11 Credits)

IJM 1115                     Language and Practical Skills for Journalists (10 Credits)

IJM 1120                     Information Technology for Journalists I (11 Credits)

IJM 1121                     Radio Production I (11 Credits)

IJM 1122                     Introduction to Communication Theories (10 Credits)

CTL 1101                    Conflict Transformation and Leadership (9 Credits)

 

Semester II(All Core Modules) (63 Credits)

IJM 1211                     Media Law (10 Credits)

IJM 1212                     Media Ethics (10 Credits)

IJM 1220                     Media and Society (10 Credits)

IJM 1221                     Information Technology for Journalists II (11 Credits)

IJM 1222                     Introduction to Television Production (11 Credits)

IJM 1223                     News Writing (11 Credits)

 

Part II (136 Credits)

Semester I (67 Credits)

Core Modules

IJM 2112                     Gender, Class, Race and the Media (11 Credits)

IJM 2116                     Communication for Development (10 Credits)

IJM 2120                     Media Economics and Management (11 Credits)

IJM 2121                     Global Media Institutions (11 Credits)

IJM 2122                     Reporting and Writing (12 Credits)

 

Practical Electives

IJM 2123                     Design and Layout (12 Credits)

IJM 2124                     Scriptwriting for Television and Radio (12 Credits)

 

Semester II (69 Credits)

IJM 2211                     Media, Human Rights and Democracy (11 Credits)

IJM 2212                     Applied Media Research Methods (11 Credits)

IJM 2213                     Public Relations I (12 Credits)

IJM 2215                     Media Texts and Reception (11 Credits)

IJM 2216                     Online Journalism (12 Credits)

 

Practical Electives

IJM 2214                     Fundamentals of Film and Video Production (12 Credits)

IJM 2220                     Feature Writing I (12 Credits)

 

Part III (129 Credits)

IJM 3001                     Industrial Attachment (129 Credits)              

 

Part IV (132-134 Credits)

 

Semester I (65-68 Credits)

 

Core Modules

IJM 4111                     Media in Africa (10 Credits)

IJM 4112                     Critical Media Theory (10 Credits)

IJM 4113                     Health Communication (11 Credits)

IJM 4120                     Investigative Journalism (12 Credits)

CBU 4109                   Entrepreneurship (12 Credits)

 

Beat and Theory Electives (Choose One)

IJM 4121                     Economic Reporting I (12 Credits)

IJM 4122                     Eco and Science Journalism I (12 Credits)

IJM 4123                     Public Relations II (12 Credits)

IJM 4124                     Sports Reporting I (12 Credits)

IJM 4125                     Photojournalism I (12 Credits)

IJM 4126                     Entertainment Reporting I (12 Credits)

IJM 4127                     Health Reporting I (13 Credits)

CBU 2102                   Marketing Communications (10 Credits)

 

Semester II (65-67 Credits)

 

Core Modules

IJM 4010                     Final Year Project (11 Credits)

IJM 4211                     Popular Culture: Theories and Perspectives (10 Credits)

IJM 4214                     Politics and the Media (10 Credits)

 

Practical Elective Modules (Choose Two)

IJM 4220                     Feature Writing II (12 Credits)

IJM 4221                     Print Project (12 Credits)

IJM 4222                     Film and Documentary Project (12 Credits)

IJM 4223                     Radio Production II (12 Credits)

 

Beat and Theory Elective Modules (Choose One)

IJM 4215                     New Media: Practical Project (12 Credits)

IJM 4224                     Photojournalism II (12 Credits)

IJM 4217                     Advertising and the Media (10 Credits)

IJM 4225                     Sports Reporting II (12 Credits)

IJM 4226                     Economic Reporting II (12 Credits)

IJM 4227                     Eco and Science Journalism II (12 Credits)

IJM 4228                     Health Reporting II (12 Credits)

IJM 4229                     Entertainment Reporting II (12 Credits)

IJM 4230                     Public Relations III (12 Credits)

CBU 1210                   Foreign Languages (10 Credits)

 

Part I (135 Credits)

 

Semester I (72 Credits)

 

IJM 1113 Media in Zimbabwe (10 Credits)

Students shall trace the development of print media, broadcasting and film in Rhodesia. The module shall also show how politics and other factors affected the operation of the media during the colonial period. Students shall also focus on the structure of the media in independent Zimbabwe, and how ownership and control affect the media today.

 

IJM 1114 Foundation Skills in Journalism (11 Credits)

The module introduces students to the basics of news writing. It focuses on the definition of news, the five Ws and H, the inverted pyramid, the different types of basic hard news lead, news values and newsroom job descriptions. Students shall also be introduced to newsgathering, as well as the different types of sources and how they can be cultivated. The module examines methods of researching news stories, as well as journalism theory, including the principles of journalism and the role of the news media. This is a practical module, therefore, students shall be expected to gather and write stories as part of their module work. They are also expected to keep abreast of current affairs and shall be tested on their news awareness.

 

IJM 1115 Language and Practical Skills for Journalists (10 Credits)

The aim of the module is to help students make a smooth transition from high school to university, as well as introduce them to effective communication skills in journalism. It helps students develop essay writing skills. The module pays attention to language and grammar for essay writing, as well as news language and style. The module also focuses on teaching proper referencing and using the Internet for academic research. Students shall also be introduced to shorthand.  

 

IJM 1220 Information Technology for Journalists I (11 Credits)

Students shall be introduced to information technology concepts and principles that are critical to the practice of journalism. They shall look at the historical and evolutionary processes that led to the development of personal computers and consider how these have impacted on their profession. They shall be introduced to computer application programs and shown how journalists can utilise these during the gathering, storage and dissemination of news in a multimedia environment. Distributed computing shall also be covered, with a focus on its impact on the journalism field. Students shall study the evolution of the worldwide web, focusing on online journalism applications.

 

IJM 1121 Radio Production I (11 Credits)

In this module, students examine various models of radio broadcasting and radio programming in Zimbabwe and in other countries. This module also equips students with skills to use radio production technology, with particular focus on microphone usage, as well as recording and editing of radio programmes.  It also equips them with knowledge about radio programme genres/formats such as radio news, radio dramas, music shows, talk shows, book reviews, and radio sport, among others. Students are also taught interviewing techniques and they are expected to produce dummy radio programmes as part of coursework. The module also examines critical aspects of gender in radio production, including gender sensitivity in programming and programme content.

 

IJM 1122 Introduction to Communication Theories (10 Credits)

The module introduces students to the basics of communication and mass communication concepts and issues. It considers questions about the nature of communication, its underpinnings and its various forms and levels in society. Students shall be introduced to models and theories of mass communication, as well as to gender, race and class issues. By the end of the module, they should be able to critically appreciate the nature and role of communication in society and be able to see mass communication as inextricably linked to other forms of human communication.

 

Semester II (63 Credits)

 

IJM 1211Media Law (10 Credits)

The module begins by examining definitions of media law and examines the importance of media laws and media regulation in general. It also explores the various Zimbabwean laws governing media practice, taking note of their historical development and how they affect media freedom. Concepts such as freedom of expression and freedom of the media shall be examined in relation to the various laws governing the media in the country.

 

IJM 1212Media Ethics (10 Credits)

The module entails defining media ethics and identifying the differences between media ethics and media law.  It examines the importance of media ethics and the various theories that are key in understanding ethics and morality. Various ethical principles such as objectivity, fairness, balance, and accuracy are explored. These issues shall also be examined in relation to issues of gender, race and ethnicity. In addition, the module focuses on codes of conduct, media councils and self-regulation, paying attention to their strengths and limitations. The module also deals with issues regarding ownership, editorial policy and their relationship to ethics. Students shall be required to undertake case studies on the ethical and professional conduct of the media, as well as on the ethical challenges faced by the media in Zimbabwe.

 

IJM 1220 Media and Society (10 Credits)

The module provides a detailed and critical overview of the normative theories of the media, such as social responsibility, libertarian, authoritarian, development and democratic participant theories. In addition, the functionalist, Marxist and watchdog roles of the media shall be examined.  Students shall also explore the relationship between media and culture, media technologies and society and the rise of the information society. In its broad analysis of the relationship between the media and society, the module shall examine power inequalities manifested through gender, race, class and ethnic relations, among others.

 

IJM 1221 Information Technology for Journalists II (11 Credits)

The aim of this module is to equip students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills to enable them to work in a multimedia environment. Students shall be introduced to computer graphics and they shall be required to create, edit, manipulate and present graphics using appropriate presentation techniques. Website design principles are introduced, with students expected to design and maintain their own websites. The major applications covered include MS FrontPage, Macromedia Dreamweaver, Adobe Photoshop and HTML. In addition, students shall study the historical evolution of the Internet, email and the World Wide Web.

 

IJM 1222 Introduction to Television Production (11 Credits)

In this module, students examine various models of television broadcasting and television programming in Zimbabwe and in other countries. They also study the various elements of television production, such as sound, lighting, camera use, set design, scenery, titling and graphics, as well as the use of sound and visual effects.   Students are equipped with knowledge about the characteristics of different television programme genres/formats, such as news, dramas, music shows, talk shows, and others. Students are also taught interviewing techniques and they are expected to produce dummy news bulletins, and talk shows as part of coursework.  The gender of television production is also examined, with particular focus on balance and equity in technical, and production roles, as well as gender sensitivity in programming and programme content.

 

IJM 1223 News Writing (11 Credits)

The module aims to develop the news writing and gathering skills gained in Foundation Skills for Journalists. That is, it develops skills gained in newsgathering and hard news writing that uses the inverted pyramid format.  It also introduces students to the hour-glass, focus, narrative and chronological styles of news writing. Students shall also be introduced to newsgathering and language use that is sensitive to gender, racial and ethnic groups.  Students are also expected to keep abreast of current affairs and shall be tested on their news awareness.

 

 

 

Part II (136 Credits)

 

Semester I (67 Credits)

 

IJM 2112 Gender, Class, Race and the Media (11 Credits)

This module critically examines the media’s coverage and representation of gender, race, class and ethnic relations in society.  Students shall study how the media can be used to advance the interests of specific minority groups in society by monitoring the media’s coverage of minority groups in Southern Africa and by analysing case studies.

 

IJM 2116 Communication for Development (10 Credits)

This module explores the relationship between development and communication, new information technologies and the media, focusing on how the media and ICTs can be harnessed to address social, political, economic and technological challenges that stand in the way of community development. It explores the concept of development, participatory models of development and the crafting of strategic communication. There is a practical approach to crafting strategies, with students expected to craft, design, implement and evaluate a communication plan in the context of a given problem. A number of theories on development shall be examined, and their validity and usefulness evaluated. The module shall also examine the roles played by governments, non-governmental organisations and other institutions in community development.

 

IJM 2120 Media Economics and Management (11 Credits)

The module examines theoretical and practical perspectives on the management of media institutions. It aims to help students appreciate key factors (including gender, race and class) in the production, marketing and distribution of media products, and also in the management of media institutions. The module focuses on how these factors affect the production, marketing and distribution of media products, as well as the management of media institutions. At the end of the module, students should have a local, regional and international perspective on the performance of media institutions and the factors affecting them.

 

IJM 2121 Global Media Institutions (11 Credits)

This module explores the political economy of global media institutions, examining how these giant cultural industries are historically interlinked with corporate institutions and how this affects the practice of journalism. Students shall examine and critique the implications of concentration of ownership and of the rise of new media. In addition, the module focuses on globalisation in the context of cultural imperialism, exploring the coverage and representation of Third World countries and the implications this has had on the African media landscape. 

 

IJM 2122 Reporting and Writing (12 Credits)

This module focuses on advanced news, building on what students have learnt in Foundation Skills in Journalism and News Writing. It shall also introduce editing for news. There is focus on advanced reporting, including advanced interviewing techniques, reporting on speeches, meetings, press conferences, as well as court and parliamentary proceedings, among others. The module also introduces investigative newsgathering techniques. Students shall also be introduced to alternative leads, including ‘buried’ or ‘delayed’ leads; multi-paragraph leads; suspenseful leads and descriptive leads, among others. They shall also focus on writing effective endings to their news stories. Students are also expected to keep abreast of current affairs and shall be tested on their news awareness.

 

IJM 2123 Design and Layout (12 Credits)

The module is chiefly practical, teaching students how to design and layout newspapers and magazines using the latest design software, such as Adobe In Design CS. Students shall also be exposed to advanced editing and sub-editing skills for both magazines and newspapers so that they can be better copy editors and sub-editors.

 

IJM 2124 Script Writing for Radio and Television (12 Credits)

This is a practical module aimed at developing skills that shall enable students to become versatile television and radio writers. Students are introduced to the linear writing process used in television and radio writing. Emphasis is placed on the relationships and responsibilities of the writer in a collaborative production process, various approaches to television and radio writing, television and radio script terminology, script development processes, and scripts formats for various television and radio genres and roles. The module also focuses on the art of drawing up programme concepts.  Students are required to approach radio and television stations with their concepts.  Those who successfully do so shall be encouraged to concentrate on perfecting their broadcast writing skills. This module also covers gender, race, ethnic and class sensitive scripting to ensure that scripts do not symbolically annihilate and negatively cover women and minority groups in society.

 

Semester II (69 Credits)

 

IJM 2211 Media, Human Rights and Democracy (11 Credits)

This module explores issues of human rights, democracy and the media within the Zimbabwean, African and global context. It explores human rights and democracy practices in the country as defined by United Nations conventions, as well as regional and other sub-regional treaties and protocols. The module shall examine the issue of human rights and democracy at individual and international levels. It also explores the importance of the media in protecting these rights.

 

IJM 2212 Applied Media Research Methods (11 Credits)

Students learn the historical background to media and communication research.  They shall learn how to identify research problems, come up with a research design, differentiate quantitative from qualitative research and how to use statistics to analyse data. They shall study various research methods and sampling techniques used in media research. Apart from general research methods, students shall also learn media specific research methods such as textual analysis, among others.

 

IJM 2213 Public Relations I (12 Credits)

The module introduces students to public relations theory and practice. The primary objective is to enable students to understand the philosophy, detail and mechanics of public relations in order to understand how public relations functions in organisations and in society. The module perspective is that PR is a communication management function through which organisations adapt to, alter, or maintain relationships with others. Students shall learn public relations principles and theory by discussing and analysing current events and by also examining how gender, race and class issues affect the practice of public relations.

 

IJM 2215 Media Texts and Reception (11 Credits)

The module traces the history of reception and audience studies and explores debates about passive audiences and powerful texts. Using well-known studies such as David Morley’s nationwide studies, students shall analyse the role of social contexts, ideology, culture, and history in people’s interpretation of media texts and the meaning they derive from them.  The module also examines issues related to commodification, ethnography and technology, and how they affect the reception of media texts. 

 

IJM 2216 Online Journalism (12 Credits)

In this module, students shall learn to use software for online journalism and shall also be equipped with skills to write and report for new media. They shall also learn to create and maintain weblogs and to use photos, video, audio and data on the Internet when presenting multimedia stories. The module also examines the impact of new media on journalism practices.

 

Practical Electives

 

IJM 2214 Fundamentals of Film and Television Production (12 Credits)

The module directs students’ attention to practical aspects of film and video production to help them develop the skills required of a versatile film producer.  It builds on the writing and scriptwriting foundation laid in the first semester. Emphasis is placed on film/video production terminology, practical aspects of camera work, and acting/performing for film/video. Students learn the basics of shooting, directing, editing, budgeting and marketing in film production.  To apply theory to practice, students are mainly expected to produce 30 minute films and/or documentaries. The module examines the responsibilities of and the challenges facing an independent film writer and producer in an independent production process. These responsibilities include script development, budgeting, producing, editing, and marketing the end product (documentary and film trailer production). Films and documentaries shall focus on gender and political topics, among others.  

 

IJM 2220 Feature Writing I (12 Credits)

The module introduces students to writing feature stories. Students shall learn how to select a topic for a feature story and how to distinguish between the different types of features. They shall learn how to write summary, quotation, anecdote, question, action/narrative and descriptive feature leads, among others. The module also examines the different formats that can be used to write the body of a feature story, as well as effective endings for features. It also introduces editing for feature articles. Students are also expected to keep abreast of current affairs and shall be tested on their news awareness. Extra credit shall be given for any published work.

 

Part II (129 Credits)

Students go on industrial attachment.

 

 

 

Part IV (132 -134 Credits)

 

Semester I (65-68 Credits)

 

IJM 4010 Final Year Project (11 Credits)

 

IJM 4111 Media in Africa (10 Credits)

The module explores the media in Africa, concentrating on selected regions. It shall provide a historical overview of the media, analysing the key issues that define and distinguish the media of one region from another. The regions studied in depth are southern, eastern and western Africa. The media environment of at least two countries in each region shall be explored. Students shall also examine how the various forms of media have performed during the colonial and post-colonial periods.  The module shall also explore emerging media ownership patterns, the factors behind them and their implications for the development of the media in Africa.

 

IJM 4112 Critical Media Theory (10 Credits)

The module briefly introduces classical Marxism before examining the ideas of critical theorists influenced by Karl Marx. Students shall take an in-depth look at the media theories of the Frankfurt School, political economy theory, Anthonio Gramsci and Louis Althussser. They shall also examine the work of theorists working within cultural studies and postmodernism. In addition, the module outlines the history of feminist theory before examining feminist perspectives on the media.

 

IJM 4113 Health Communication (11 Credits)

This module explores various health communication strategies and the role of the media in communicating health issues. It offers a theoretical base for the understanding and promotion of health behaviour. The module outlines models of health behaviour promotion, culminating in the design of a communication strategy. The module also examines how access to health information and services can be affected by gender roles, the different needs and interests of women and men, as well as relations between men and women. Students are expected to monitor the Zimbabwean media’s coverage of various health issues, as well as assess how new information and communication technologies have contributed to health communication.

 

IJM 4120 Investigative Journalism (12 Credits)

The module introduces students to the world of investigative reporting, focusing on investigative reporting skills/techniques ranging from hypothesis formulation, planning, researching, interviewing and writing. Students shall also examine the ethics of investigative reporting. They are also expected to keep abreast of current affairs and shall be tested on their news awareness.

 

Beat and Theory Electives

 

IJM 4121 Economic Reporting I (12 Credits)

The module introduces techniques for researching and writing about the economy and business. Students shall be equipped with the knowledge and skills required to cover economics, financial markets and companies. They shall be introduced to microeconomics and macroeconomics, microeconomic policy and business journalism ethics. They shall also be equipped with the skills to write about financial markets and company accounts. They shall be expected to produce business and financial news stories.

 

IJM 4122 Eco and Science Journalism I (12 Credits)

The purpose of this module is to teach students how to research, report and write about science and the environment. Topics covered shall range from the history of science and environmental journalism to local, national and global laws and policies on the environment. The module also covers ethical issues in science and environmental reporting, the interpretation of scientific jargon and the use of statistics. Students shall write in-depth articles about scientific and environmental issues with the goal of publishing them.

 

 

IJM 4123 Public Relations II (12 Credits)

The module builds on the knowledge that students have gained from Introduction to Public Relations, as well as on their experiences in industry. Through seminars and group discussions, students shall explore public relations concepts in relation to their experiences in industry. Through case studies of local and international companies, students shall explore the practice of PR and how it affects the performance of companies in both profit and non-profit making industries. As part of continuous assessment, students shall be expected to design and implement a PR programme in partnership with an organisation of their choice.

 

IJM 4124 Sports Reporting I (12 Credits)

The module introduces students to sports reporting as a specialised form of journalism and considers both philosophical and practical issues about the field. It also interrogates the relationship between the sports industry and the media and how it affects the practice of professional sports journalism, with reference to both local and international cases studies. Gender, race and class issues and how they affect sports reporting shall be considered to enable students to understand their impact on the mediation of sport in general. In practice, students shall be expected to attend and report on sporting events.

 

IJM 4125 Photojournalism I (12 Credits)

The primary goal of this module is to equip students with skills beyond the technical aspects of photography. Students shall learn the theory and practice of manual and auto focus cameras and the principles of composition. They shall be trained to process digital images using modern software packages. They shall also be expected to critique the use of pictures in the print media in Zimbabwe. At the end of the module, students should be able to think critically about content and composition.

 

IJM 4126 Entertainment Reporting I (12 Credits)

The module explores different types of entertainment reporting for print and online media. These include film and television programme reviews, book reviews, music album or song reviews, celebrity news and gossip, fashion, modelling, and entertainment features. The module also introduces students to the entertainment industry so that they can effectively report entertainment issues.

 

 

IJM 4127 Health Reporting I (13 Credits)

This module introduces students to the practice of health reporting. It considers the history of health reporting and the factors that have led to it being a significant part of the media industry. Students shall be introduced to the language of health reporting, sources and markets for health stories, health reporting ethics and contemporary issues dominating health reporting. At the end of the module, students should be able to identify and develop health stories for both print and electronic media.

 

Semester II (65-67 Credits)

 

IJM 4010 Final Year Project (11 Credits)

 

 

IJM 4211 Popular Culture: Theories and Perspectives (10 Credits)

The module explores the various definitions of popular culture and its relationship to the media. Students shall also examine several theoretical perspectives on popular culture, including the Frankfurt School, political economy theory, neo-Gramscian hegemonic theory, cultural studies, feminism and postmodernism. The module also focuses on popular music, soap operas, film, advertising, fashion, and reality television as forms of popular culture.

 

IJM 4212 Politics and the Media (10 Credits)

The module aims to provide a deeper understanding of the role of the media in modern democracies by examining normative and critical perspectives on political media. Students shall study the construction of political news and examine the forces that shape news stories. They shall also examine the use of photography and political cartoons in the news media. In addition, the module focuses on the media’s political effects and the impact of new media on political news.  Students are expected to monitor local, regional and international political news and shall be required to critically analyse news stories. The module also pays attention to political news management, the marketisation of political news, election coverage and war/crisis reporting.

 

Practical Electives

 

IJM 4220 Feature Writing II (12 Credits)

The module builds on the skills obtained in Feature Writing and also introduces students to column writing. It focuses on researching, writing and editing several types of feature stories. Students shall be equipped with skills to research, write and edit news features, news analyses, profiles and narrative features, among others. The module shall highlight the differences between informational, expressive, descriptive, persuasive and narrative writing that uses fictional techniques to tell nonfiction stories. It also takes an in-depth look at persuasive and expressive feature writing. It shall introduce students to leader/editorial writing, writing opinion columns, reviews as well as political and lifestyle columns. Areas of focus shall include adopting the right tone to gain readers’ confidence, developing a credible argument, choosing the appropriate language, as well as using dramatic emphasis for lively and engaging pieces.   Extra credit shall be given for any published work.

 

 

IJM 4221 Print Project (12 Credits)

The module is the culmination of all practical print journalism modules. Students are expected to show their understanding of these practical modules through producing either a newspaper or a magazine. They are expected to show understating of writing stories, design and layout.

 

IJM 4222 Film and Documentary Production Project (12 Credits)

This module draws on knowledge gained by students in year one and two modules on television production.  Students are expected to develop a film script that focuses on gender, HIV/AIDS, culture, and power problems in society. The script should indicate the problem, the struggle, the climax, and lastly, the resolution of the problem.  Narrative theories are also be used as a point of reference in crafting and shaping the theme of the film in the script. Student are then required to use production aesthetics, shot sizes, scenery, costumes, light, sound, and so forth, to convert the script into a film that can change attitudes, stimulate tolerance, and unite audiences to adopt the theme. The module tests students’ competencies in initiating and completing pre –production, production, and post production stages in film production.  It empowers students with the skills to become independent film producers who can come up with best-selling films. The module also focuses on the production of trailers for marketing produced films. 

 

IJM 4223 Radio Production II (12 Credits)

This module focuses on radio news, magazine, and current affairs programmes. It focuses on the use of conventions of news bulletin, magazine, phone-in, and radio discussion and radio current affairs formats to produce these programmes. Students shall be assigned to produce various radio programmes.

 

Beat and Theory Electives

 

IJM 4215 New Media: Practical Project (12 Credits)

Students shall establish their own new media projects and manage them during the module of the semester. They shall design websites for specific communities or organisations and regularly upload information during the module of the semester. They are expected to produce projects with visual appeal and with content that is easy to use and access.

 

IJM 4224 Photojournalism II (12 Credits)

Photojournalism students shall receive practical training in photographing, editing and presenting news and feature stories in which the essential information is photographic. The program prepares photojournalists who are fully aware of the power of photography, are well grounded in the legal and ethical traditions of the profession and are practically prepared to make a significant contribution to contemporary journalism. Technical skills development in Photoshop and the advanced use of professional digital cameras is combined with an academic understanding of the historical debates and critical theories of photojournalistic practice.

 

IJM 4217 Advertising and the Media (10 Credits)

The module introduces students to advertising and how it relates to the media industry. This shall entail tracing the history of advertising, understanding the relationship between advertising and culture, as well as its influences on commercial media. Students shall explore the development and operations of advertising agencies as a key component of advertising. They shall also evaluate the Zimbabwean advertising industry. The module also explores ethical issues in advertising. Students shall also focus on practical aspects such as media planning, the creative process in advertising and the actual production of advertisements.

 

IJM 4225 Sports Reporting II (12 Credits)

The module is tailored for students who have experience in sports reporting and who want to further develop their knowledge and skill as sports journalists. It shall build on knowledge and skill gained in the introductory module, with emphasis on specialised reporting and feature writing. Conceptually, students shall explore the history, nature and market for specialised sports reporting. In practice, students shall be expected to choose a sports discipline to specialise in, and, as part of continuous assessment, develop a portfolio of critical, in-depth and analytical feature articles on that discipline. Extra credit shall be given for any published work.

 

IJM 4226 Economic Reporting II (12 Credits)

The module builds on Introduction to Economic Report and equips students with other skills required to effectively cover the economy and business. Students shall continue to examine microeconomics and macroeconomics, financial markets, economic policy and company accounts. They shall also be introduced to covering business finance, debt markets and poverty. They shall be expected to produce business news stories, features and analyses. Extra credit shall be given for any published work.

 

IJM 4227 Eco and Science Journalism II (12 Credits)

This module examines important issues that journalists need to know in order to cover science and the environment. Students shall pay special attention to the story of the century: the climate change that shall affect every aspect of our society. The module shall examine the current debates on global warming and the journalists who report on it. They shall also examine notable scientific discoveries, inventions, adaptations and other developments, looking at both their positive and negative effects. Students shall learn how to recognise and find good stories, how to approach environmental and scientific issues, how to deal with scientists, as well as how to research, report and write from the field. They shall learn to use a variety of tools, including qualitative research, in environmental and science news gathering. The module shall deal with current, controversial topics and students shall strive to have their individual work published or broadcast. Extra credit shall be given for any published work.

 

IJM 4228 Health Reporting II (12 Credits)

Advanced health reporting builds on the knowledge and skills gained in Introduction to Health reporting. At this stage, students are introduced to specialised health reporting, paying attention to why and how it developed. Case studies of the coverage of particular health issues shall be examines as part of continuous assessment so as to critically evaluate the role and importance of health reporting in society. Students shall also be expected to write health features on areas of their choice. Extra credit shall be given for any published work.

 

IJM 4229 Entertainment Reporting II (12 Credits)

This module builds up on the introductory module but pays particular attention on entertainment reporting in the broadcast media. The module focuses on different kinds of programmes on television and radio that are fact-based but are also meant to be artistic and entertaining. This module allows students to focus on these types of programmes, learning to create unique, interesting personal stories, and specific styles of writing and interviewing for radio and television entertainment. Students shall choose an entertainment/feature program, do an extensive deconstruction of it and create their own original half hour entertainment/feature program that includes a ‘backgrounder’, an interview and a profile.

 

IJM 4230 Public Relations III (12 Credits)

The module builds on the knowledge and skills gained in Advanced Public Relations I, and provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of those skills. The primary aim of the module is to prepare students to work in the public relations industry. The module shall focus on crisis, corporate and online communication. It shall also examine events management and international public relations. Working in groups, students shall tackle two public relations campaign projects.

   

CONVENTIONAL

$505/semester

PARALLEL

$605/semester

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